WassonArtistry.com
The Art and Craft of Jeff Wasson
Armor :: Gauntlets

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Welcome to the Gauntlets section.

Here you will find images of various gauntlets I have made over the years. Most are based on historical gauntlets, but I also make gauntlets for people who do medieval combat and fight with swords or clubs.

These gauntlets were made this summer (2012) of 1050 spring steel.

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Same as above. They have great mobility and also excellent protection. Notice the fingernails embossed into the fingertip plates. Also note how the glove of buff leather is stitched into the gauntlet via leather lining straps. When the glove becomes worn it can be cut out and a new one stitched in.

These gauntlets were based on Italian 1460s gauntlets. I was very fortunate to be able to examine existing real 15th c. gauntlets to base my replicas off of.

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Same gauntlets as above. Notice that the left and right are assymetrical. This is typical for mid 15th c. Italian gauntlets. The left hand is holding the reigns and needs to be stouter since it may more directly take a hit from a lance.

The right hand handles the lance, sword or weapon and must be more mobile. It articulates at the wrist, and has more articulations over the thumb and fingers.

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14th c. hourglass gauntlets. 1050 spring steel.

Hourglass gauntlets appeared in the 14th c. and were used right into the early 15th c.

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Late 14th c. gauntlets of hourglass form. Made of 1050 hardened and tempored steel with applied brass decoration "washed" in gold.

These gauntlets belong to the 1380s English armour.

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Same as above. The decoration on the brass consists of embossed elements, wriggle work, and a chiseled inscription.
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Also, these gauntlets have thumb and fingernails embossed in the fingertip plates, as can be seen in gauntlets from this time. Medieval armour often tries to imitate parts of the body and sometimes turns them into abstractions over time.
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Early 15th c. gauntlets. Made of 1050 spring steel.

Notice that these are similar to hourglass gauntlets, but articulate at the cuff. The metacarpal plate also extends up over the fingers offering better protection. The fingers are protected by red leather with plates riveted in.

These are based off a surviving pair in the armoury of the castle of Churburg.

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14th c. hourglass gauntlets. 1050 spring steel.
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A pair of Milanese mid 15th c. gauntlets of 1050 hardened steel.
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Here you can see the glove stitched in to a leather band riveted to the cuff of the gauntlet.
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14th century finger gauntlets.

1050 hardened steel, Summer 2007

The knuckle plates are steel plated with gold. The blackening is done with linseed oil which is burned into the surface. The finger plates have embossed lines that give them strength and add to the overall decoration.

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Same as above.

The gold rivets around the cuff hold in a lining strap that the glove is stitched into. The finger plates are riveted to leather that is riveted to a rider plate. The fingers of the glove are stitched to these leathers.

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14th century gauntlets

1050 hardened steel, April 2007

Raised from a single piece of steel, the shaping was inspired by a pair of child's gauntlets in Chartre Cathedral.

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Same as above.

These Gauntlets were trimmed with brass that was embossed and decorated with wriggle work. The trim was gilt, as were the knuckles.

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15th century Gothic finger gauntlets

Mild Steel, May 2004

These are very simple in design, usually you see gauntlets of this type covered in fluting. These were made to complete an armor in a consistent style.

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Early 15th century Gauntlets.

1050 hardened steel, Spring 2007

These gauntlets were inspired by english gauntlets depicted on effigies in the middle of the first half of the 15th century. They are somewhat speculative.

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14th century finger gauntlets

1050 hardened steel, April 2004

These gauntlets were inspired by the gauntlets of the Black Prince, his funeral achievements and his effigy in Canterbury Cathedral. The fingers and knuckles are more generic being based on archeological finds in London.

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